Dual role for the Mighty Columbia


Ferries can do more than just transport people and cars.

Author's collection

AMHS vessel helps to track ocean acidity
Ellis # 1477
"Ferry landing-Edmonds-
Wash"
It's still in the same spot, but the dock at Edmonds looks a little
different today, and it has been many, many years now since
the
Klickitat last made a landing there.

Back when Ellis took this photo, the
Klickitat and Nisqually
were the largest ferries to serve the route, and they held down
the run for many years.  By the 1960's, when the Supers
arrived, the
Tillikum shifted to the route, with the Illahee
running second and the
San Mateo, Klahanie and Kehloken
providing extra service.

By the late 70's and early 80's, one Super had been assigned to
the route, usually running with the
Chelan, but by the end of
the decade the route was served most often by the
Yakima and
Hyak.

The run, which started with such small boats as the Quillayute
(which also included a stop at Port Ludlow) is now served by
two of the largest vessels in the fleet--either the
Spokane or
Walla Walla and the Puyallup.
Adding color to the past
I love black and white photography.  I take black and white photos myself.  I am very much  opposed to classic films being colorized.
Why then do I colorize so many photos on the site?

For many of the ferries on this site, there simply are no color photos in existence.  Many of the vessels vanished before color photography became cheap enough for the general public to utilize.  Colorizing the
photos, being as historically accurate as possible, gives a new perspective to the vessels, seeing how they must have looked like "back in the day."

Colorizing  adds a bit of depth to the history.  It's one thing to read the descriptions of the bright red curtains that once framed the windows in the
Kalakala's galley and quite another to see it. The photos take
on new life, and suddenly the days of Moonlight Cruises don't seem all that long ago.

Colorizing photos can help to make the past seem not so dim and distant, a reminder that the world wasn't black and white back when the
Quilcene plied the waters of Puget Sound, but was as bright and
colorful as taking a photo of the
Samish today.  In the grand scheme of things, it really wasn't that long ago, after all, and a bit of color can help keep history alive.
Meanwhile in Prince Rupert...

The dock there is about to get a major upgrade.

Auhtor's collection. Yeah, yeah, it's not the dock, and the Queen of Prince Rupert is long gone, but I miss her.  And the old
livery.  And the old B.C. Ferries flag...

BC Ferries Prince Rupert terminal gets a $12M upgrade

A Heads up if you are traveling to the San Juan Islands
this spring
Major road construction will be kicking off on April 2nd, and it will cause traffic delays.  If you're heading out to the islands,
give yourself extra time.

Photo courtesy of Brandon Swan.

Anacortes construction expected to cause delays to ferry
terminal
The Lounge, S.S. Princess May
The Princess May was one of the few vessels that Canadian Pacific picked up second hand for use
on the Salish Sea.

Launched as the
Cass  in 1888 for the  Formosa Trading Company for service on the China coast.  
From 1888 until 1901, she sailed in this capacity, changing owners and names several times,
including  
Arthur, then back to Cass,  then to Ningchow and Ha-ting, which was its name until 1901.


Canadian Pacific picked her up in 1901, and on  27 May , 1901,  newly  the renamed
Princess May
was placed on the 800-mile route from Vancouver, British Columbia  to
Skagway, Alaska.  She proved successful on the route, and in 1906 the company  rebuilt the
superstructure and enlarged passenger accommodations.  

On 5 August  1910 the
Princess May became perhaps the most famous shipwreck on the Pacific
coast.  Having departed from Skagway, Alaska, with  80 passengers, 68 crew, and a shipment of
gold,  the
Princess May was sailing  south down Lynn Canal  when she encountered heavy fog.   She
soon found herself aground on the rocks  near the north end of Sentinel Island. Soon the tide ran
out,  leaving the steamer
 high and dry in what was to become an iconic photo.

She was salvaged a few weeks later and resumed service. In 1911, she became the first ship CP
converted to oil-firing. Sold in 1919, she went into service in the Caribbean, and was deliberately
scuttled in 1935.
Winter
** Standard disclaimer --may not be completely
current due to maintenance needs, etc.

Winter  schedule runs from 7
January 2018 to 31 March 2018


ANACORTES - SAN JUAN
ISLANDS
 
ELWHA - SAMISH - HYAK
TILLIKUM (Inter-island)

ANACORTES - SIDNEY
Suspended until 1 April 2018

PORT TOWNSEND -
KEYSTONE
KENNEWICK

MUKILTEO - CLINTON
TOKITAE
KITTITAS

EDMONDS - KINGSTON
PUYALLUP
WALLA WALLA

SEATTLE - WINSLOW
( AKA Bainbridge Island)
TACOMA
WENATCHEE

SEATTLE - BREMERTON
KALEETAN
CHIMACUM

SOUTHWORTH -VASHON -
FAUNTLEROY
CATHLAMET
ISSAQUAH
SEALTH

POINT DEFIANCE -
TAHLEQUAH
SALISH
STANDBY- IN THE YARD
YAKIMA
SPOKANE
CHELAN
CHETZEMOKA
FOR SALE


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