For those who think the ferry service isn't
critical
...
Just take a look at this.
We’re struggling to feed our students. Loss of ferry service
isn’t a minor issue.


Photo courtesy of Shawn J. Dake.
Ellis # 1835
"Ferry Dock-Winslow-WN"
Ellis snapped this photo early in the days of
Washington State Ferries, as the
Quinault at the
dock has WSF livery, but still has the large
windows on the car deck.  

The fleet hadn't been in terrific shape when the
state took over operations--you couldn't exactly
blame Captain Peabody for not pouring tons of
money into a fleet that he was soon going to be
forced into selling.  

Almost at once, WSF began investing money into
reconditioning the fleet.  Extensive repairs were
made to the Wood Electrics first, followed by the
Steel Electrics.

The Steel E's were in better condition, but the
large windows on the car deck were a constant
problem, the glass being broken all the time.  
Indeed, it's rare to find a picture of any of the
ferries without some of those panes of glass
broken.  WSF solved the problem by plating them
over, leaving an large open porthole on the deck
instead.
The
Quinault was the last of the Steel E's to have
that work done, and she is the most common to be
seen in WSF livery with the loarge windows still in
place.


A nautical highway on the edge...
2019 saw some good things happen for WSF and some profoundly negative ones.  
On the plus side, the new plan charts a realistic course for the ferry system, and has done probably the first truly pragmatic assessment of the condition of the fleet since 1962.
And therein lies the bad.  
The fleet is aging fast, and the Issaquah Class' reliability essentially means they are being worked to death.  The remaining Supers are increasingly unreliable, and the
Elwha needs at least
ten million in new steel.
The problem always remains money, and the fact that the legislature has failed to replace the money taken away from WSF from the
FIRST $30 car tab reduction twenty years ago.
The time for cobbling budgets together has long past.  Bridges are not a viable solution, and it's time for the legislature to step up to the plate and fully fund the ferry system, including a new
construction program.  If they don't, prepare yourselves for reductions in service--planned or as the result of elderly vessels breaking down.


Above, the Hyak on her last day of service, 30 June 2019.  Photo courtesy of Matt Masuoka.

Here they come...
B.C. Ferries newest ferries are on their way from Romania.
BC Ferries’ new hybrid electric ships are on their way to British
Columbia


They kind of look like this. Sort of.  Photo of the Salish Orca courtesy of Brandon Swan.

No, you're not seeing things...
The Tacoma was sporting a moustache for the month of November.  Here's why:

Tacoma ferry dons mustache for 'Movember'

The Tacoma and a gorgeous Seattle sunset.  Photo courtesy  Matt Masuoka.
The Princess Louise...
There's a very good reason that Canadian Pacific's
"Princess fleet" are described as "pocket liners."  From the
early part of the twentieth century on, the vessels embodied
many attributes of first-class Atlantic liners.  Indeed, some of
the accommodations on board the
Princess Charlotte,
Princess Victoria, Princess Kathleen, Princess Louse and
Princess Marguerite
would easily have been found on the
company's Empress liners crossing both the Atlantic and
Pacific.

The
Princess Louise was special in the fact that she was,
unlike nearly all of the other vessels for Canadian Pacific,
built in Canada.   
A product of the Wallace Shipyard in North Vancouver, and
an immediate success, it was hoped that the company
would instigate a local building program for their Princess
fleet.
Alas, it was not to be.  The next two Princess ships--the
Marguerite  and Kathleen were built in the U.K. at John
Brown & Co. Ltd., Clydebank, Scotland as several of their
other ships had been.

The
Louise would spend much of her life in Los Angeles,
operating as the Princess Louise Restaurant until she sank
while undergoing renovations.  She was later raised, and
sunk in deep water.


FALL
** Standard disclaimer --may not be completely current due to
maintenance needs, etc.

Summer schedule runs from 29 September 2019 to 4
January 2020

ANACORTES - SAN JUAN
ISLANDS
 
SEALTH- SAMISH - YAKIMA
TILLIKUM (Inter-island)

ANACORTES - SIDNEY
CHELAN
(Route will be temporarily shut down from 12
November - 8 December due to lack of SOLAS vessels)

PORT TOWNSEND -
KEYSTONE

SALISH


MUKILTEO - CLINTON
SUQUAMISH
TOKITAE

EDMONDS - KINGSTON
WALLA WALLA
SPOKANE


SEATTLE - WINSLOW
(AKA Bainbridge Island)
TACOMA
P
UYALLUP

SEATTLE - BREMERTON
KALEETAN
CHIMACUM

SOUTHWORTH -VASHON -
FAUNTLEROY

ISSAQUAH
K
ITSAP
KITTITAS


POINT DEFIANCE -
TAHLEQUAH

CHETZEMOKA

IN THE YARD
CATHLAMET
WENATCHEE
CHELAN
KENNEWICK

?
ELWHA

RETIRED
KLAHOWYA
HYAK


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