C
CENTRAL
Official Number: 218611 Radio Call Number: ------- BUILT: 1919  LENGTH: 60.2'  BEAM 18.5'
DEPTH:4.8 Gross/Net Tonnage: 30/20
Built for service between Clinton and Everett.
FINAL DISPOSITION:
Listed as "Abandoned, 1950."
Photo courtesy of the Captain Raymond W Hughes collection.
CENTRAL II
BUILT 1919 LENGTH: 65' BEAM: 19'
HISTORY: The 65-foot ferry
Central II was chartered from Mrs. Berte Olson by Puget Sound Freight Lines to run with the Pioneer on the Gooseberry Point - Orcas Island crossing.

FINAL DISPOSITION:  Destroyed by fire on August 20, 1931.
(Photos courtesy of the Bayless Collection.)
CITY of ANGELES
A-City of Long Beach
OFFICIAL NUMBER: 203193 BUILT  1906, As City of Long Beach  LENGTH: 125' BEAM:  35' DEPTH: 10 GROSS/NET TONNAGE: 442/347  PROPULSION: STEAM, 450 HP
AUTO CAPACITY: 26

HISTORY: Owned by the Port Angeles Transportation Co. Converted to ferry in 1923 for the  Anacortes and Sidney, B. C. run, with stops at Orcas and
Roche Harbor in the San Juan Islands, by the Victoria - Anacortes Ferry Co., headed by Capt. Harry W. Crosby. Transferred ownership when PSN bought out Crosby.

FINAL DISPOSITION: Scrapped 1938.
(Photos: Author's collection)
CITY of CLINTON
OFFICIAL NUMBER: 222110 BUILT 1922, Clinton, Washington.  LENGTH: 58' BEAM: 22' DEPTH: 8.2 GROSS/NET TONNAGE: 57/39

HISTORY: Built at Clinton, Washington for service to Everett.

FINAL DISPOSITION: On March 23, 1929 while en route the ferry caught fire and sank off Mukilteo.
Photos courtesy Raymond W Hughes Collection.
CITY of EDMONDS




OFFICIAL NUMBER: 222875 BUILT: 1923  LENGTH: 56'.9" BEAM: 20' DEPTH:6'.8"
GROSS/NET TONNAGE: 49/38

HISTORY: Built for Sound Ferry Lines.  
"On  Sunday morning, May 20, 1923, the automobile ferry City of Edmonds  makes its first
run from Edmonds to Kingston, inaugurating a new route across Puget Sound. As regular
service begins, the ferry is "exceptionally well patronized" by both walk-on passengers and
automobiles."  (Edmonds Tribune-Review, May 25, 1923)

FINAL DISPOSITION: Destroyed by fire September 1926.

Photo courtesy Captain Raymond W Hughes Collection.
CITY of KINGSTON
A-Rubaiyat; C-Lake Constance
OFFICIAL NUMBER: 222819 BUILT 1923 LENGTH: 59.6' BEAM: 22.4' DEPTH: 8.5 GROSS/NET TONNAGE: 66/45  AUTO CAPACITY: 7

HISTORY: Built at Dockton as the freigher
Rubaiyat.   After taking a load of gypsum for Seattle, the vessel began leaning to port.  Captain  G.F. Ryan turned the wheel to swing her half a
point to starboard.  The vessel continued to list, finally rolling over and sinking in 220 feet of water, drowning four members of the crew. She was raised and rebuilt a the ferry
City of Kingston
in 1924 as a running mate for the
City of Edmonds, taking over for the Clatawa which began service to from Port Gamble to Port Ludlow.  
In 1934, the
City of Kingston was sold by Black Ball to William P. Thornton for the crossing on Hood Canal from Brinnon to Seabeck.  At this time, she was renamed Lake Constance.   She
was taken over by Berte Olson in 1939 and continued on the same route under the same name.  
The
Lake Constance was put up for sale in 1950 when the Port Gamble-Shine run closed with opening of the new Southpoint-Lofall run.

FINAL DISPOSITION: Moved to Alaska; abandoned on the beach in Juneau, 1972.
Photos courtesy of the Captain Raymond W Hughes collection.
CITY of MUKILTEO




OFFICIAL NUMBER: 226675 BUILT: 1927  LENGTH: 104.3" BEAM: 34.9 DEPTH: 8.9
GROSS/NET TONNAGE: 150/102

HISTORY: Built for Whidbey Island Ferry Lines, for the Mukilteo-Columbia Beach route.

FINAL DISPOSITION: Destroyed by fire at Columbia Beach, April 11, 1932

Photo courtesy Captain Raymond W Hughes Collection.
CITY of STEILACOOM




OFFICIAL NUMBER: 223660 BUILT: 1924, Gig Harbor  LENGTH: 91.2  BEAM: 26.6
DEPTH: 9.8  GROSS/NET TONNAGE: 134/87

HISTORY: Built by the Skansie Brothers, the  
City of Steilacoom operated between
Tacoma and Fox Island by Pierce County. Re-engined in 1952 with a Caterpillar diesel.
Put out of work by the new bridge in 1954.
Sold in 1962 to Webb School of California and moored in the San Juan Islands as an
adjunct to a boys' school.

FINAL DISPOSITION: Scrapped, 1975.

Photo courtesy Captain Raymond W Hughes Collection.
CITY of TACOMA
OFFICIAL NUMBER: 221831 BUILT 1921 LENGTH: 147.2' BEAM: 43.6' DEPTH: 9.5 GROSS/NET TONNAGE: 269/179  AUTO CAPACITY: 36

HISTORY: Auto ferry service began on the Narrows route between Tacoma and Gig Harbor in 1921 when the Skansie Brothers completed  the
City of Tacoma. The ferry had a capacity of
36 automobiles and 300 passengers.   Re-engined as a diesel in 1927. Retired and sold, 1951.  Served as a floating breakwater and storage barge at Lake Washington Marina.

FINAL DISPOSITION: Sank at Yarrow Bay, July 1969.  The old ferry is a popular dive site.
CLATAWA
OFFICIAL NUMBER: 211556 BUILT 1913, Dockton, Washington.   LENGTH:  85.9 BEAM: 27.7 DEPTH: 6.2 GROSS/NET TONNAGE: 79/54  

HISTORY: Steamer used by the Alki Point Transportation Co, converted to a ferry in 1924.  In 1924 she started service from Port Gamble to Port Ludlow, working the route until 1936 when
she was turned over to Berte Olson for use on the same run, as well as the Port Gamble-Shine route.
She was taken over by the Navy in 1944 as the
YFB-50 for use between Hadlock and Indian Island.

FINAL DISPOSITION: Destroyed by fire, 1958.
CITY of SEATTLE

OFFICIAL NUMBER: 126536 BUILT: 1888, Portland, OR  LENGTH: 121.5  BEAM: 33.2 DEPTH: 8.6  GROSS/NET TONNAGE: 272/186

HISTORY: The first ferry on Puget Sound, operating between Seattle and Alki. Sold in 1913 to the Martinez and Benicia Ferry and Transportation Company,California.  There, she ran from
Mare Island to Vallejo.  In 1944, the ferry was taken over by the US Navy, becoming the YFB-54.  She ferried passengers between the shipyard on Mare Island and Vallejo for the duration of
the war.  She was sold in 1947 by the Navy, and ended up in private ownership with the Tellis family 1956.  The
City of Seattle was converted into a private residence and fully restored.

FINAL DISPOSITION: Still in use as a residence in Sausalito.

Photos courtesy Captain Raymond W Hughes Collection/ Brandon Moser.