C
CENTRAL
BUILT: 1919  
OFFICIAL NUMBER: 218611
L/B/D: 60 x 19 x 5 GROSS/NET TONS: 36/24 PASSENGERS/AUTOS:
HISTORY:
Built for service between Clinton and Everett. 1925: Whatcom County. Sold to
Clarence Price, 1930, re-engined.  Sold to James Masterson, 1932-33.  Sold to Pioneer
Seafoods, 1936. Sold to Cordova Packing Company, 1944. Sold to Gravina Point Co, 1946.
FINAL DISPOSITION: Abandoned/scrapped 1949.

Photo courtesy of the Captain Raymond W Hughes collection.
CENTRAL II
BUILT: 1924
OFFICIAL NUMBER: 224095
L/B/D: 60 x 24 x 8 GROSS/NET TONS: 59/40 PASSENGERS/AUTOS:
HISTORY:
Built for Willis Nearhoff’s Whidby Island Ferry Lines. Transferred to PSN in 1929.  To Agaton Olson, 1931; burned at Lummi Island Indian Reservation August 10, 1931. Sold to MA
Montgomery and rebuilt as a freighter by 1933; converted to motorship, 1939-40.  Sold to U.S. Briscoe Jr, 1948.
FINAL DISPOSITION:  Abandoned/scrapped 1962.
CITY of ANGELES
A-City of Long Beach
BUILT: 1906
PREVIOUS/LATER NAMES: a. City of Long Beach, b. City of Angeles
OFFICIAL NUMBER: 203193
L/B/D: 125 x 35 x 10 GROSS/NET TONS: 442/347 PASSENGERS/AUTOS:  /26 cars
PROPULSION: steam, 450 HP
NAME TRANSLATION: For the city of Port Angeles.  The bay was named in 1791, by Juan Francisco de Eliza, who called it de Nuestra Senora de Los Angeles. A year later, Capt. George
Vancouver shortened the rather long Spanish name to the present form.
FINAL DISPOSITION: Scrapped, 1938.
(Photos: Author's collection)
CITY of CLINTON
BUILT: 1922, Clinton, Washington.  
OFFICIAL NUMBER: 222110
L/B/D: 58 x 22 x 8 GROSS/NET TONS: 57/39 PASSENGERS/AUTOS:
HISTORY: Built at Clinton, Washington for service to Everett.
NAME TRANSLATION: For the city of Clinton, a town on Whidbey Island; It was named for Clinton County, Iowa, by Edward C. Hinman who came from Iowa in 1883 and filed a timber claim.
FINAL DISPOSITION: On March 23, 1929 while en route the ferry caught fire and sank off Mukilteo.

Photos courtesy Raymond W Hughes Collection.
CITY of EDMONDS

BUILT: 1923  
OFFICIAL NUMBER: 222875
L/B/D: 57 x 20 x 7 GROSS/NET TONS: 49/38 PASSENGER/AUTOS:
HISTORY: Built for Sound Ferry Lines.  "On Sunday morning, May 20, 1923, the
automobile ferry
City of Edmonds makes its first run from Edmonds to Kingston,
inaugurating a new route across Puget Sound. As regular service begins, the ferry is
‘exceptionally well patronized’ by both walk-on passengers and automobiles."  (Edmonds
Tribune-Review, May 25, 1923)
NAME TRANSLATION: For the city of Edmonds. Brackett named the area Edmonds in
1884, and it was officially incorporated as a village in 1890. It was named after Vermont
Senator George Franklin Edmunds.
FINAL DISPOSITION: Destroyed by fire September 1926.
.

Photo courtesy Captain Raymond W Hughes Collection.
CITY of KINGSTON
A-Rubaiyat; C-Lake Constance
BUILT: 1923, Dockton, WA.
PREVIOUS/LATER NAMES: a. Rubaiyat, b. City of Kingston, c. Lake Constance
OFFICIAL NUMBER: 222819
L/B/D:  60 x 22 x 9 GROSS/NET TONS: 66/45 PASSENGERS/AUTOS:  /10 cars
NAME TRANSLATION: For the town of the same name. In 1869, W.S. Ladd and his wife, Caroline built a cabin on Appletree Cove. Michael King then bought the cabin 9 years later. He
moved in along with 10 oxen and 10 men. They slowly logged the hills around Appletree Cove. King built many small buildings and shacks along the shore for his men and animals. In 1882,
he was done and moved on. The shacks and bunkhouses were left behind and lived in by drifters, squatters and old loggers. People living in the area often referred to this as King's Town,
probably as a joke. The name slowly evolved into Kingston and stuck.
FINAL DISPOSITION: Moved to Alaska; abandoned on the beach in Juneau, 1972.

Built at Dockton as the freighter
Rubaiyat.   After taking a load of gypsum for Seattle, the vessel began leaning to port.  Captain G.F. Ryan turned the wheel to swing her half a
point to starboard.  The vessel continued to list, finally rolling over and sinking in 220 feet of water, drowning four members of the crew. She was raised and rebuilt as the ferry
City of
Kingston
in 1924 as a running mate for the City of Edmonds, taking over for the Clatawa which began service to from Port Gamble to Port Ludlow.  
In 1934, the
City of Kingston was sold by Black Ball to William P. Thornton for the crossing on Hood Canal from Brinnon to Seabeck.  At this time, she was renamed Lake Constance.   She
was taken over by Berte Olson in 1939 and continued on the same route under the same name.  
The
Lake Constance was put up for sale in 1950 when the Port Gamble-Shine run closed with opening of the new Southpoint-Lofall run.



Photos courtesy of the Captain Raymond W Hughes collection.
CITY of MUKILTEO
BUILT: 1927  
OFFICIAL NUMBER: 226675
PREVIOUS/LATER NAMES: May have been named Central IV before going into service.  
Official records show no name other than
City of Mukilteo.
L/B/D: 104 x 35 x 9 GROSS/NET TONS: 150/102
HISTORY: Built for Whidbey Island Ferry Lines, for the Mukilteo-Columbia Beach route.
NAME TRANSLATION: For the city; the present name, suggested by J. D. Fowler, the first
postmaster, is from the Indian name of the place which is thought to mean "good camping
ground." Muckl-te-oh was revised to suit the postal service. Spellings on older maps
include Muckilteo, Muckleteo, and Muckiltoe. It was incorporated May 8, 1947.
FINAL DISPOSITION: Destroyed by fire at Columbia Beach, April 11, 1932


Photo courtesy Captain Raymond W Hughes Collection.
CITY of STEILACOOM
BUILT: 1924, Gig Harbor  
OFFICIAL NUMBER: 223660
L/B/D: 91x 27 x 10 GROSS/NET TONS: 134/87 PASSENGERS/AUTOS:
HISTORY: Built by the Skansie Brothers, the City of Steilacoom operated between
Tacoma and Fox Island by Pierce County. Re-engined in 1952 with a Caterpillar diesel.
Put out of work by the new bridge in 1954. Sold in 1962 to Webb School of California and
moored in the San Juan Islands as an adjunct to a boys' school.
NAME TRANSLATION: For the city of Steilacoom. Founded as Port Steilacoom by
Lafayette Balch and was one of the first towns in Washington.   There are several
versions of the name origin, including that it was "...derived from Chief Tail-a-koom"
(Dictionary of Indian Geographic Names); that it was for the "...pink flowers plentiful in that
locality..." (Henry Sicade, Tacoma Times. June 19, 1920); that "Steilacoom was named
after Steilacoom Creek by Lafayette Balch who spelled it 'Cheilcoom.'
FINAL DISPOSITION: Scrapped, 1975.


Photo courtesy Captain Raymond W Hughes Collection.
CITY of TACOMA
BUILT: 1921, Gig Harbor, WA.
OFFICIAL NUMBER: 221831
L/B/D: 150 x 44 x 10 GROSS/NET TONS: 269/179 PASSENGERS/AUTOS: 300/50
HISTORY: Auto ferry service began on the Narrows route between Tacoma and Gig Harbor in 1921 when the Skansie Brothers completed the City of Tacoma. Re-engined as a diesel in
1927. Retired and sold, 1951.  Served as a floating breakwater and storage barge at Lake Washington Marina.
NAME TRANSLATION: for the city of Tacoma (see Tacoma)
FINAL DISPOSITION: Sank at Yarrow Bay, July 1969.  The old ferry is a popular dive site.
CLATAWA
BUILT: 1913, by John Martinolich, Dockton, Washington.   
OFFICIAL NUMBER: 211556  RADIO CALL SIGN: WH5454
L/B/D:  86 x 28 x 6 GROSS/NET TONS: 79/54  
HISTORY: Steamer used by the Alki Point Transportation Co, converted to a ferry in 1924.  In 1924 she started service from Port Gamble to Port Ludlow, working the route until 1936 when
she was turned over to Berte Olson for use on the same run, as well as the Port Gamble-Shine route. She was taken over by the Navy in 1944 as the YFB-50 for use between Hadlock and
Indian Island.
NAME TRANSLATION: Klatawa is a Chinook Jargon word meaning “to go” or “to travel.”
FINAL DISPOSITION: Sold to Fisherman’s Packing Corp, Bellingham, Washington, 1958. (Chas. A Hansen, as of 1961, owner.) Listed in active service as of 2019 by USCG as a freighter.
CITY of SEATTLE
BUILT: 1888, Portland, OR  
PREVIOUS/LATER NAMES: a. City of Seattle, b. Magdalena, c. City of Seattle
OFFICIAL NUMBER: 126536
L/B/D: 122 x 33 x 9 GROSS/NET TONS: 272/186
HISTORY: The first double-ended ferry on Puget Sound, operating between Seattle and Alki. Sold in 1913 to the Martinez-Benicia Ferry & Transportation Company, California.  There, she
ran from Martinez to Benicia.  In 1944, the ferry was taken over by the US Navy, becoming the YFB-54 (as Magdelena). She ferried passengers between the shipyard on Mare Island and
Vallejo for the duration of the war.  She was sold in 1947 by the Navy and ended up in private ownership with the Tellis family in 1956.  
NAME TRANSLATION: For the city.
FINAL DISPOSITION: The City of Seattle was converted into a private residence and fully restored at Sausalito, CA.


Photos courtesy Captain Raymond W Hughes Collection/ Brandon Moser.